interview

MOM Interview: Farzad Varahramyan

Farzad Varahramyan worked as a production designer on Abe’s Oddysee, Abe’s Exoddus and Munch’s Oddysee. He was gracious enough to answer our questions.

lcad_farzad

Magog on the March: How much creative persuasion did Lorne Lanning have over your artworks? Did he have a strict aesthetic or were you allowed free reign with what you created?

Farzad Varahramyan: Once Lorne felt you had absorbed the “visual DNA” of Oddworld he was very generous, especially at the beginning of preproduction, so we could explore the craziest and coolest concepts that he was imagining. There was also a lot of times where Lorne had very specific visions and he knew where every nut and bolt needed to go. Whether it was specific or open exploration within the rules of Oddworld, it was always creatively fulfilling and Lorne was truly gifted at getting the best work out of any of us.

Magog on the March: Why did it take hundreds of iterations—as evidenced by “Oddworld: The Lost Archives“—before reaching to the final Munch design? Was it a painful process?

Farzad Varahramyan: Lorne had an epic story in mind with multiple key heroes, spanning 5 major games, before we had even finished Abe’s Oddysee. So any spare cycles we had, I or the master: Steven Olds, we’d sketch up the latest iteration of Munch. Lorne would come up with the craziest and newest premises for Munch all the time. I staid on Munch the longest so I had the privilege of discovering him with Lorne.

The process was definitely painful at times, but it was this “pain” that Lorne taught me would ultimately result in a great character. You had to put in the time and pain to explore as much as you could.

The important thing to remember was that each time, the process, saved a small but solid bit of the concept that would eventually make it, in one form or another, into the final. For example, about halfway thought when Munch became amphibian, the top fin on his head survived all the way through to the end, despite most other elements getting scrapped. The concept was the fin was functional but also a deterrent for above the water predators that may see it and think they were dealing with a more predatory sea creature. At the core of the character, Lorne always wanted an abused and lovable soul.

Magog on the March: Which unincluded creature do you think fits the most into the Oddworld universe?

Farzad Varahramyan: I think most of us that worked at Oddworld were very sorry to see Elum not come back after Abe’s Oddysee. I think it may have been a gameplay reason for it, but we all just loved the character and how Abe and it interacted.

Magog on the March: What is your favourite part of the entirety of the lore?

Farzad Varahramyan: I don’t think I was alone in this, especially those of us working on the games: it was the idea that this beautifully spun lore and story was a metaphor for our own real world and the conflict of the natural clean world Vs. the capitalistic and materialistic values that are still destroying our real world. This was pretty deep and unique stuff, especially at the time where most games were about the usual sequalized genres you see to this day. Lorne was really onto something worthwhile and as he and Sherry used to say “games with nutritional value”.

Almighty
This photo was kindly sent to us by Farzad Varahramyan. Here is the description provided by him: “It’s a photo of the original sculpt I did for the Almighty Raisin. It was laser scanned for accuracy and re-built in engine.”

Magog on the March: Who is your favourite Oddworld character? Why?

Farzad Varahramyan: Easy: Abe! I think Steven Olds’ visual design DNA for the world that Lorne imagined was a game changer. Steven came up with the visual foundation of what Abe became and the world he lived in. It also required the back and forth with both Lorne and Steven to refine Abe into the beloved character he is to this day. Collaboration like that is the true genius.

I also think that’s one of the most admirable things about Lorne: collaboration. He is pretty much a “great concept” generating engine, but one of the great things about Lorne is that he knew a great idea no matter who it came from and immediately knew how to weave it into the larger scheme. I think that requires true creativity, and it needs to be divorced from ego.

Magog on the March: You were responsible for “Abe being able to drink a Brew, pass wind, control the gas and detonate it whenever it was positioned“. Are there other ideas of yours that you should get credit for?

Farzad Varahramyan: I think the credit you give me on the exploding gas, goes to illustrate what I just said about Lorne’s ability and detachment from ego, to take an idea he thinks is good and turn it into something that actually works. It’s one thing to have a fun idea, the real work is when the whole team agrees this is a worthwhile idea to pursue and actually figures out how to make it feel good and look fun for the player experience. The real credit goes to everyone that made that idea actually a fun game feature.

Magog on the March: You produced many artworks for the Oddworld universe. Roughly how much of the Quintology was put to paper before you departed the company?

Farzad Varahramyan: I left when my last responsibility on Munch was done. I had created some open ended explorations of environments and locations for Oddworld/Mudos, but that was about it for me.

Magog on the March: You didn’t work on Stranger’s Wrath. What is your opinion on some of the character designs, such as the Clakkerz and Grubbs? Do they feel Oddworld to you?

Farzad Varahramyan: At the time I was at Oddworld working directly under Steven and then Lorne, I’d say the most successful designs, or the one’s that felt Oddworld, were the one’s that had something very familiar that drew indirect lines of reference to real world animals or creatures. If you look at Steven’s Scrabs, Paramites, or one of my favorites: Sligs, they all have varying degrees of familiarity and you draw indirect lines to what they may remind you of: arachnids but not quite, squids but not really. I hope this make sense.

Magog on the March: Why did you choose to leave Oddworld Inhabitants after Munch’s Oddysee was released in 2001?

Farzad Varahramyan: The honest answer is I was looking for greater responsibility as a creator but at the time there was no opportunities at Oddworld. Lorne was very magnanimous as always and understood my reasons. He had mentored and trained me well, instilling in me his drive to create and direct. I’ll be forever thankful to Lorne. He helped me grow into the creative visual director I am today.

Magog on the March: What are you working on next in your professional life?

Farzad Varahramyan: After a fruitful 23+ years as a studio art director, I’ve decided to launch my own business as a freelance creative visual director.

I decided to go back to what I love doing professionally the most: and that is to be brought in at the pre-production of new concepts or re-imagined properties and help visually develop them. It’s what I enjoy doing the most professionally.

Personally, I’m developing original art/design projects that I hope to start making available to the public starting in 2019.

soulstorm

A Personal Take on Soulstorm’s Alternate Reality Game

The Magog on the March! News to cure your ARG blues!

Today our special guest, Sliglet, s’got a few words to say about this Alternate—whats-a-yer-call-it—Reality Game? The one being churned out by those chumps at Oddworld Inhabitants. Y’all know the one I mean.

Remember, neither Magog on the March or Rumor Kontrol endorse or really care too much one way or the other about Sliglet’s informed viewpoint. If you don’t like it, GET OVER IT!

Sliglet?

— N.C. Slig


DISCLAIMER: While this critique is built on facts, it portrays my own subjective opinion.

When I first heard about Soulstorm and joined the related communities, the ARG’s first phase had already started, so I only joined later, if I remember correctly, at the Message box[1] puzzle or maybe a bit later. For a long time, namely until the third phase, I had no big problems with the ARG, sure it was a bit slow sometimes, but one can bear with that. It was compensated by being dark, mysterious, vague, but not too vague and its puzzles were challenging but fair. And let’s be honest, an ARG, done by OWI? It was very exciting to see what kind of dark secrets will surface while we play this game.

I have to commend OWI for starting this project because a proper ARG takes tons of preparation and extra work from the developers and yet they decided to do it. However, sadly, there is hardly anything I can praise except these efforts.

 

spirit1
In an attempt to fill the gap between New ‘n’ Tasty and the upcoming Soulstorm, Oddworld Inhabitants has been tinkering with an ARG, which depicts the struggle of a renegade terrorist organisation fighting back against the evil Magog Cartel.

 

In my opinion, the ARG took a huge nosedive starting with its third phase and I’d like to explain the details of why I’m saying this:

– Ed, and nearly every other of OWI’s in-universe characters, are all very one-dimensional. Most of them are based on one “emotion” or goal only, which leads to them to become very repetitive and boring. There is no “character development”, as such. Ed was a cowardly whistleblower at the very beginning and he still is. If one compares his first few tweets[2] and his newest ones, there is hardly any difference between them. I can forgive that he doesn’t have much personality because that’s the point of his character, a nobody who does a lot. But there is nothing that connects us to Ed, that makes us care for him. He has episodes of anxiety and depression, but that’s about it. Another character, the revolutionary group Spirit of 1029 has stated many times how they are against propaganda, yet their tweets[3] are almost solely composed of these kinds of messages. “We will rise”, “A storm is brewing”, “Join us”, just to name a few. The only exception to this is ironically the Magog Cartel Twitter[4]. Their tweets are full of snarky and dark humor, reminiscent of the tone of the original two Oddworld games. If the aforementioned two characters were this well-executed, then while the ARG still wouldn’t be perfect, it would be much more fun to play.

– The newer puzzle rewards are abysmal compared to the work one has to do to solve them. Many of these contain vague, filler sentences that just frustrate the solver rather than provide enjoyment. As an example, it has been established early that the new SoulStorm Brew is not only flammable, but after ingestion the consumer develops a very strong addiction to it. Two days without the brew causes the addict to suffer lethal cardiac arrest. This information has been hinted at since March of 2017 and it has been confirmed in September. Yet puzzles following this revelation still tried to sell us this as new and shocking information[5]. But this is not even the most irritating example. Throughout the whole ARG we have seen the “We will rise” and “A storm is brewing” messages so many times, that the community became desensitized to them. They were no longer hype-inducing, instead they just made people sigh and immediately disregard them.

– OWI seemingly haphazardly/randomly/arbitrarily changes the ARG before our very eyes. I would have no problems with them modifying things up in the background, those puzzles and information which we haven’t discovered yet, but if something has already been revealed, then it should be left untouched or at the very least the change should be explained in-universe. A very prominent example is the second phase of the ARG. Over the course of months, we were supposed to uncover five pictures[6], which – as we later found out – were part of the game’s teaser trailer. However, one day the placeholder for the fifth picture just disappeared without any reason. To the community’s inquiries, OWI replied with “the initial phase of the ARG ended when [they] wanted to”[7]. Not only is this dishonest practice, it shows that the company was not prepared properly for this occasion.

– There have been multiple long pauses in the ARG. These were the following:

* July – December 2016 (with some minor activity in September)
* May – August 2017
* September 2017 – May 2018

 

gin6gii
The Soulstorm ARG started very strong and had a lot of support from the community. The exhaustive length of the experience, however, has created a lulling effect, and many players have since abandoned the hunt for more clues.

 

While it is indisputable that an ARG has to pause at times so development and real-life events can catch up, but in this case, neither of these pauses were communicated properly to the community. The characters just stopped posting as if they had dropped dead in their places. The lack of communication caused confusion multiple times, especially at the time of the third and longest pause. This could have been mitigated by simply having an in-universe event that causes the characters to go into hiding. For example, before the almost ten-month pause, Magog could have announced that it found the current hiding place of the Spirit of 1029, who could have released a frantic tweet explaining that they had to escape and erect a new base of operations, which will probably take a very long time. To add insult to injury, OWI had multiple times purposefully dodged questions related to the ARG’s status and one time even openly mocked a concerned ARG solver[8]. While this was done from the MagogCartel Twitter account, it still feels unnecessarily rude and unprofessional.

However, the problem that I think drove the last nail into the ARG’s coffin is the lack of direction. There is no official source from where one could comfortably start their solving career. It took the valiant efforts of multiple members of the community to make summaries, trying to give a helping hand to anyone who would like to participate. And, of course, total documentation isn’t and shouldn’t be expected to be provided, but a pointer, a nudge in the right direction or a quick recap would help the community greatly. At the time this article is written, we received “the ARG is still going on and there are older clues left unsolved” as a status report from OWI. This simply doesn’t work. The first part of the sentence is almost useless without any kind of extra information and the second part falls apart because of the previous problem. Even if people took the time to solve them, they would probably get some vague message about the oncoming revolution which equals to a laugh in their faces. This kind of vagueness is especially appalling, because in the older phases of the ARG OWI did create a recap[9]. It wasn’t perfect per se, but it was magnitudes better than the one-liner answers we get in the Official Discord.

 

pkbh4iu
Will Ed and the Spirit of 1029 achieve victory over the malicious Magog Cartel? Unless the most dedicated ARG players can find something to help motivate them forward, it looks unlikely!

 

All in all, the ARG had a lot of potential, but most of it went to waste because of completely avoidable problems. The continuous mismanagement and miscommunication made the majority of the ARG solving communities pull out their forces and because of this, only the most loyal fans remained. However, this is not the point of an ARG. An ARG should bring new people into the series, incite hype, and provide new information to the fans. In its current state, it provides neither of these. It is not exciting enough to pull in new people, it provides disappointingly few details to the loyal solvers and it lacks the distinct “Oddworld-feel”. If we would remove Brew and the Oddworldian creatures from this ARG, the remaining skeleton could fit almost any dark themed game.


References

[1] http://oddworldlibrary.net/wiki/Soulstorm_ARG_Summary#20160323
[2] https://twitter.com/edmudokon
[3] https://twitter.com/SPIRITOF1029
[4] https://twitter.com/MagogCartel
[5] http://oddworldlibrary.net/wiki/Soulstorm_ARG_Summary#20180530 - "This thing is lethal"
[6] http://web.archive.org/web/20170222211607/http://www.oddworld.com/soulstorm/
[7] https://imgur.com/fJbaXPc
[8] https://twitter.com/MagogCartel/status/968903190010847237
[9] https://us3.campaign-archive.com/?u=2b6dca21053bc375cbdad7077&id=b08e7b2d60&e=6a2b5665ee
abe's oddysee

Finding the Source: A Brief History of Oddworld’s “Lost Code”

Earlier this week, Oddworld Inhabitants made a groundbreaking announcement that a huge cache of archived Oddworld material had been found, which included the source code for Abe’s Oddysee, something that was believed to be lost—or, rather, unworkable—for many years. Today I thought we would take a moment to talk about the bewildering history of Oddworld’s source code, what it means, and the implications of this announcement.

ssae0006
This “HD Screenshot” of Abe’s Exoddus, which was used for promotional purposes, is believed to utilise the original, uncompressed, high-quality assets.

When Oddworld Inhabitants partnered with JAW, rumour quickly spread around the internet concerning a polished, HD upgrade of the two original Oddworld titles. Upon shaking hands with Stewart Gilray, Lorne Lanning handed the entire Oddworld archive over to JAW, which included thousands of discs worth of footage—at least 15 TB of data were collected by the team, all of which was preserved by Lanning et al during the closure of Oddworld Inhabitants in 2005. On those discs were models, assets, audio, and documents, ranging from Abe’s Oddysee to the unreleased Brutal Ballad of Fangus Klot.[1] Gilray also declared that JAW had access to the source code from the first two games:

We’ve got the source code to both Abe’s Oddysee and Abe’s Exoddus. However, we don’t have final PSone code for Oddysee, and no PC code, but we have final PC code for Exoddus, and no PSone code. So we’ve got a mix.[2]

Of course, one must then beg the question that if JAW had access to the source code all along, why would they opt to build a remake from the ground up when a polished version of Oddysee and Exoddus would have performed with equal eminence, if not more? The answer is one of practicality and accessibility. In simple terms, the software used to create Oddysee and Exoddus is so archaic when compared to modern technology that the team could not find a way to work with the archived source. [3][4] JAW even reached out to some members of the original design team to try and understand how the old builds operated, yet even these high-profile veterans were stumped with the state of the source code.

One of the guys now works at Google in Munich, one works with Rad Game Tools, and another has just done some work with Lorne Lanning on his non-game related project.[5]

We must remember that the original Oddworld games were a helter-skelter mess from a design perspective. While the final products embody the spirit of two of the greatest digital experiences of all time, the men and women who were building these games were not seasoned game designers, and would do whatever they needed to do to achieve a result. As such, the code that is left behind was not tailored for posterity’s sake and appears to be quite unorthodox.

The abysmal state of the source code was further confirmed earlier this year when Truant Pixel re-created The Shrink for a new PS4 theme, and discovered challenges in transferring the original build of the geometrically complex character to new software. In layman’s terms, the team had to “selectively isolate and rebuild the model components”, and in some cases had to cover up missing pieces with clever replicas. In the end, it took “a couple of weeks” to update the single model of the Shrink into something that could be manipulated and used in modern software.[6] How long then would it take to update the entire game?

 

boardroom-feat
New ‘n’ Tasty was made because the original source code could not be easily manipulated for modern engines.

 

According to Alex Carroll of Oddworld Inhabitants, Square One is the company responsible for finally cracking the code that might allow the source to be manipulated in a more convenient manner. Carroll claimed that the narrative of the discovery was quite fascinating, saying further that:

We’re working closely with Square One who are technical wizards at this sort of stuff. Some of the source was actually missing but they’ve done an amazing job at getting it all recompiled, given the age of the tools and the code.[7]

Beyond the complexity of the source code, however, there is also the issue of the raw assets themselves. While there a couple of exceptions, such as the large matte painting of RuptureFarms, which was a digital construction produced by Steven Olds and used for the FMV sequences of Abe’s Oddysee, the majority of the assets from the original two games lack the quality to be updated into anything acceptable by modern standards. For this reason, not a single code of the original game was inherited by New ’n’ Tasty’s updated engine.

The old backgrounds are 640 × 240. We really can’t go backwards in quality.[8]

What does it mean, therefore, that Oddworld Inhabitants now has open access to the original source code of Abe’s Oddysee? Even if the code can now be manipulated, would it even be worthwhile to attempt a polished version of the two original games when the quality can only be improved so much. It has certainly been proved—take a look at the Happy Hol-ODD Days Christmas Card for proof—that the old sprites and animations can potentially be used to create a familiar, if limited, experience, but what is the extent of these ancient assets? How far can they be feasibly stretched? Is it really possible to bring a venerable version of Abe HD to the next generation of consoles and appease those who were disheartened with New ’n’ Tasty? I’m not sure it will be so easy, but time will tell.

One thing is for sure, we can now finally stop quipping about how the source code fell out of Lanning’s back pocket during brunch.

References

[1] Stewart Gilray, The Making of Oddworld Stranger's Wrath HD (https://magogonthemarch.com/the-making-of-oddworld-strangers-wrath-hd/)
[2] Stewart Gilray, Oddworld Forums — Oddbox: AO & AE at higher resolution (http://www.oddworldforums.net/showpost.php?p=473849&postcount=20)
[3] "Glitch", Oddworld Forums — Happy Hol-ODD Days 2011! (http://www.oddworldforums.net/showpost.php?p=523883&postcount=51)
[4] Lorne Lanning, Reddit AMA with Lorne Lanning & Stewart Gilray  (https://magogonthemarch.com/qa/reddit-ama-2012/)
[5] Stewart Gilray, A glimpse into the future of Oddworld  (https://www.destructoid.com/a-glimpse-into-the-future-of-oddworld-248708.phtml)
[6] Unknown Truant Pixel Employee, Oddworld: Rebuilding "The Shrink" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1jwSdzKcJBM&feature=youtu.be)
[7] Alex Carroll, The Official Oddworld Inhabitants Discord (Posted by OWI_Alex on 5/12/17 at 2:10 PM)
[8] William Bunce-Edwards, Oddworld Forums — Abe HD (http://www.oddworldforums.net/showpost.php?p=527739&postcount=154)
abe's oddysee

Abe’s Oddysee: A Case of the Parasites

In Lorne Lanning’s recent interview with Caddicarus, the creative mastermind behind Oddworld likened the dense mythology of the series to an onion, boasting many layers for the audience to sift through, always uncovering something new once they believed they had reached bedrock. Lanning claims that the audience’s level of engagement is inspired by the amount of work that a creator injects into their work to create the foundation of a world that is both interesting and believable.

Alas, only the tips of these lore-heavy icebergs—or lorebergs, as I call them—are ever uncovered, the bulk of the creator’s efforts hidden beneath the surface to maintain the sanctity of the world they support.  Sometimes, however, the ocean currents shift, the elements do their mystical dance, and Climate Change plays its part to make a few of these lorebergs sweat and reveal a piece of mythology that was potentially staring us in the face the whole time.

If we turn back the clock to ’97 and boot up our brand new copy of Oddworld: Abe’s Oddysee, we’re greeted with one of the most breathtaking introductions to the Sony Playstation. We drift through the dystopian paradise of RuptureFarms, riding the miserable wavelength of Abe’s voice, until we find ourselves in the belly of the beast at the RuptureFarms Annual Board Meeting where the infamous mudokon floor waxer comes face-to-face with destiny.

The visual presentation at the Board Meeting, presented by Molluck and his trusty slig secretary, is bare-bones compared to the New ’n’ Tasty version, which is brimming with nuggets of lore that we will decipher in a future article. The slides serve a curt purpose of exposition, telling us what we need to know, i.e. the profits are falling and something needs to be done.

Yet there is a small detail that has rarely come up in conversation over the past twenty years, seen on the side of the sale statistic pages:

Molluck.png

What could those symbols be? They almost look like insignias. Are they just decoration? I’m not so sure, for the following reason. Under each symbol is a short excerpt of unintelligible writing, and each excerpt is a different length. This suggests some sort of description or dialogue, perhaps commentary. But what entities could possibly be commentating on the statistics presented at the RuptureFarms Board Meeting who aren’t already present?

Lorne Lanning has already provided the answer:

Then you have the Glukkons, Vykkers, Gloctigi and Oktigi—the Oktigi are a more powerful as families. So, in Stranger, Sekto is an Oktigi. They’re more primal to the evolution than the Glukkons so they’re not even full land‐forms yet. They’re parasites. When we do make the movie and you see the boardrooms of the Magog Cartel, they’re all modelled after parasites, leeches, flees, ticks… but they’ll be sitting there in Armani suits.

— Lorne Lanning, Nathan Interviews Lorne Lanning

They do look strikingly parasitic, don’t they? The last one even looks suspiciously like an octigi! And if we interpret Lanning’s vision for the abandoned Oddworld film and apply it to what we’ve seen in the games, it’s not hard to apply these symbols seen in the RuptureFarms Board Meeting to corresponding investors, providing feedback and commentary on the state of the company’s performance from their luxury suites in Nolybab.

What do you think? Have we already seen a glimpse of the investors? Was this why the symbols were sorrowfully missed in the revamped introduction of New ‘n’ Tasty, because their appearance so soon could be construed as a spoiler? Perhaps we can infer their prodigious appearance from their symbols. Or perhaps we could choose not to, otherwise we might all have nightmares. After all, we all know that powerful entities control the fabric of Oddworld, and the price of failure is steep:

There are scenes in the film I want to do where Mullock, after he fucked up and he’s being taken to the boss and he passes his mom who says “You blew it,” and he has to go down and meet the investors. They live underground; like how I said about how the world is separated. He takes an elevator ride down 1700 storeys and a little midget guys picks you up as an escort, but as you go down and the temperature increases, they’re getting bigger and bigger, while the security guards from up above are dying and sweltering from the heat.

— Lorne Lanning, Nathan Interviews Lorne Lanning Again

soulstorm

A Quintology of Errors: Soulstorm & Greater Oddworld Lore

For the first time since Soulstorm’s announcement in early-2016, Lorne Lanning has spoken openly and in great detail about Oddworld’s upcoming release, which is touted as a successor to the original game, Abe’s Oddysee, and a spiritual remake of the classic Abe’s Exoddus. What is being described as a “revolutionary” title was finally unveiled at the EGX 2017 keynote, and while no footage of Soulstorm was explicitly shown, Lanning provided an interesting exposé on what to expect from the final game.

 

Screen Shot 2017-09-23 at 4.24.37 am
A storm is brewing at the new and improved Soulstorm Brewery.

 

The most poignant aspect of Lanning’s entire keynote was Soulstorm’s status within the fabled Quintology. As most Oddworld Inhabitants fans know, the Quintology was always slated to be a five-act experience, beginning with Abe’s Oddysee, followed closely behind by Munch’s Oddysee, then Squeek’s Oddysee, and two final episodes that were never announced or even spoken about. Each of these acts would simultaneously introduce a new hero within the Oddworld mythos—starting with Abe—while exposing the complex and seemingly endless socio-political structure of the grandiose powers that control Abe’s world. Of course, as has been well-documented, plans changed, which began when Abe’s Exoddus was unexpectedly released the year after Oddworld Inhabitants debut title.

Abe’s Exoddus—which is the foundation for the upcoming Soulstorm, or the “backbone” as Lanning describes it—was not an official entry in the Quintology. While the story picked up immediately from the ending of Abe’s Oddysee, it was always described as a “Bonus Game”, intrinsically linked to the first act of the Quintology. The biggest contributing factor to Abe’s Exoddus’ status as a “Bonus Game” is its thematic value, which relies heavily on the beats from its predecessor, and does very little to advance the overall story. Essentially, from a storytelling perspective, if you’ve experienced Abe’s Oddysee, you’re not missing much from Abe’s Exoddus.

Surprisingly, this is changing with Soulstorm; Lanning states it will be the second part of the Quintology. This is not a small decision. The fallout from this alteration has ramifications for the entire series, which is still implied to be told over five acts. This, of course, means that one of the planned acts has to go, and based upon the many snippets revealed throughout the EGX keynote, it seems very likely that anything of any value from Munch’s Oddysee has been preserved and rejiggered into Soulstorm’s framework, sans our little lonely gabbit.

 

Screen Shot 2017-09-23 at 4.09.51 am.png
Molluck the Glukkon is back, a character who was not slated to return until his trial against Lady Margaret in Munch’s Oddysee!

 

Not only will the vykkers make an appearance—supposedly as the architects behind the eponymous beverage—Oddworld’s larger socio-politcal structure, which Lanning has never spoken about publicly before, and the power struggle of this daunting, pyramidal scheme will finally have an influence upon the ongoing Oddworld story. He hints at the higher powers, those who tower over Molluck the Glukkon, preparing the audience for the revelation that someone as seemingly influential as the mastermind behind Mudokon Pops is nothing but a puppet on a very long ladder to “The Eye”.

During the keynote, Lanning also begins to detail the waves of revolution and the cone of trepidation that will ripple out as a consequence of Abe’s actions at RuptureFarms. The closure of the worlds largest meat processing plant is going to shake the foundations of the pyramid, causing a great deal of concern for the many investors with stock in the company and reflected upon the average consumer, pushing up prices on all their favourite tasty treats. This is notable because previous Oddworld games have barely hinted at the larger economic ramifications of Abe actions, yet Soulstorm seems to be setting the stage for the fires of rebellion and the eventual collapse of this socio-political system, the original thread of the Quintology that never really came to the forefront.

 

Screen Shot 2017-09-23 at 3.23.47 am.png
Oddworld’s foundations will be shaken to its core.

 

The great irony, however, is that Abe never intended to spark a rebellion; he never intended to fracture the pyramid. He only sought to preserve himself from being chopped up into a Sunday snack, yet the unintended consequences of his actions have branded him a terrorist, placing him in the crosshairs of everyone towering above him.

As Lanning so eloquently puts it:

He’s raising prices of your Happy Meal! He’s gotta go!

Yet that is the fabric of Oddworld, a twisted version of our own corrupt system, and it’s wonderful to see these facets come into the light after dwelling for so long in the darkness. It certainly provides Soulstorm with a platform to show everyone what Oddworld really has to offer beyond the dark aesthetics and the slapstick comedy.