A Quintology of Errors: Soulstorm & Greater Oddworld Lore [2017]

A Quintology of Errors: Soulstorm & Greater Oddworld Lore

Date: 22/09/2017

For the first time since Soulstorm’s announcement in early-2016, Lorne Lanning has spoken openly and in great detail about Oddworld’s upcoming release, which is touted as a successor to the original game, Abe’s Oddysee, and a spiritual remake of the classic Abe’s Exoddus. What is being described as a “revolutionary” title was finally unveiled at the EGX 2017 keynote, and while no footage of Soulstorm was explicitly shown, Lanning provided an interesting exposé on what to expect from the final game.

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A storm is brewing at the new and improved Soulstorm Brewery.

The most poignant aspect of Lanning’s entire keynote was Soulstorm’s status within the fabled Quintology. As most Oddworld Inhabitants fans know, the Quintology was always slated to be a five-act experience, beginning with Abe’s Oddysee, followed closely behind by Munch’s Oddysee, then Squeek’s Oddysee, and two final episodes that were never announced or even spoken about. Each of these acts would simultaneously introduce a new hero within the Oddworld mythos—starting with Abe—while exposing the complex and seemingly endless socio-political structure of the grandiose powers that control Abe’s world. Of course, as has been well-documented, plans changed, which began when Abe’s Exoddus was unexpectedly released the year after Oddworld Inhabitants debut title.

Abe’s Exoddus—which is the foundation for the upcoming Soulstorm, or the “backbone” as Lanning describes it—was not an official entry in the Quintology. While the story picked up immediately from the ending of Abe’s Oddysee, it was always described as a “Bonus Game”, intrinsically linked to the first act of the Quintology. The biggest contributing factor to Abe’s Exoddus’ status as a “Bonus Game” is its thematic value, which relies heavily on the beats from its predecessor, and does very little to advance the overall story. Essentially, from a storytelling perspective, if you’ve experienced Abe’s Oddysee, you’re not missing much from Abe’s Exoddus.

Surprisingly, this is changing with Soulstorm; Lanning states it will be the second part of the Quintology. This is not a small decision. The fallout from this alteration has ramifications for the entire series, which is still implied to be told over five acts. This, of course, means that one of the planned acts has to go, and based upon the many snippets revealed throughout the EGX keynote, it seems very likely that anything of any value from Munch’s Oddysee has been preserved and rejiggered into Soulstorm’s framework, sans our little lonely gabbit.

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Molluck the Glukkon is back, a character who was not slated to return until his trial against Lady Margaret in Munch’s Oddysee!

Not only will the vykkers make an appearance—supposedly as the architects behind the eponymous beverage—Oddworld’s larger socio-politcal structure, which Lanning has never spoken about publicly before, and the power struggle of this daunting, pyramidal scheme will finally have an influence upon the ongoing Oddworld story. He hints at the higher powers, those who tower over Molluck the Glukkon, preparing the audience for the revelation that someone as seemingly influential as the mastermind behind Mudokon Pops is nothing but a puppet on a very long ladder to “The Eye”.

During the keynote, Lanning also begins to detail the waves of revolution and the cone of trepidation that will ripple out as a consequence of Abe’s actions at RuptureFarms. The closure of the worlds largest meat processing plant is going to shake the foundations of the pyramid, causing a great deal of concern for the many investors with stock in the company and reflected upon the average consumer, pushing up prices on all their favourite tasty treats. This is notable because previous Oddworld games have barely hinted at the larger economic ramifications of Abe actions, yet Soulstorm seems to be setting the stage for the fires of rebellion and the eventual collapse of this socio-political system, the original thread of the Quintology that never really came to the forefront.

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Oddworld’s foundations will be shaken to its core.

The great irony, however, is that Abe never intended to spark a rebellion; he never intended to fracture the pyramid. He only sought to preserve himself from being chopped up into a Sunday snack, yet the unintended consequences of his actions have branded him a terrorist, placing him in the crosshairs of everyone towering above him.

As Lanning so eloquently puts it:

He’s raising prices of your Happy Meal! He’s gotta go!

Yet that is the fabric of Oddworld, a twisted version of our own corrupt system, and it’s wonderful to see these facets come into the light after dwelling for so long in the darkness. It certainly provides Soulstorm with a platform to show everyone what Oddworld really has to offer beyond the dark aesthetics and the slapstick comedy.